Crouzon Syndrome

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Occurring in about 15 in one million babies, this syndrome results from an underdevelopment of the bones in the middle third of the face and head. The child has a high, flat, prominent forehead and a head that is wider than usual; bulging eyes because of small eye sockets; strabismus, in which one eye tends to turn to the side or upwards rather than straight ahead; a smaller-than-normal upper jaw and protruding lower jaw; crowding of the teeth; a high, arched, narrow palate; and, in about half of children, hearing loss. There are no obvious abnormalities of the fingers or toes. Not all children with Crouzon syndrome have these problems to the same degree; some problems may be severe, while others are minor or virtually non-existent.

Learn more about Crouzon syndrome in Related Articles: Craniosynostosis

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2017-12-11T22:53:45+00:00